Category: Speaker

Wendy Nilsen, Ph.D.

Looking into the Future of Informatics and Healthcare
Wendy Nilsen, Ph.D.
Program Director, NSF
Speaking Time: 12:50pm-13:25pm, 17-Feb-17 (Friday)
Speaking Location: Ballroom-D




Abstract
Science is changing rapidly and new transdisciplinary approaches are resulting in transformative across domains. Health and medicine have begun to embrace convergent approaches that would allow for transformative approaches that involve expertise from non-traditional disciplines. Biomedical- and Health Informatics are poised to contribute to these changes by bring sophisticated techniques to partnerships in the biomedical realm. This talk will cover some advances being made and a vision for future.

Short-Bio
Wendy Nilsen, Ph.D. is a Program Director for the Smart and Connected Health Program in the Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering at the National Science Foundation. Her work focuses on the intersection of technology and health.  This includes a wide range of methods for data collection, data analytics and turning data to knowledge. Her interests span the areas of sensing, analytics, cyber-physical systems, information systems, big data and robotics, as they relate to health.  More specifically, her efforts include: serving as cochair of the Health Information Technology Research and Development community of practice of the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Program; the lead for the NSF/NIH Smart and Connected Health announcement; convening workshops to address methodology in mobile technology research; serving on numerous federal technology initiatives; and, leading training institutes. Previously, Wendy was at the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR).

Posted in Keynote, Speaker

Edward Livingston, MD.

A National Strategy For EMR’s
Edward Livingston, MD.
Deputy Editor, The Journal of The American Medical Association (JAMA)
Speaking Time:  12:50pm-13:25pm, 18-Feb-17 (Saturday)
Speaking Location:  Ballrom-D




Abstract
During the past decade, great pressure was applied to physicians to convert from paper to electronic medical records. Housing patient information in electronic databases conferred substantial advantages since it was all too common to not have a medical record available when seeing patients. Digitizing medical information overcame this limitation but created new problems unanticipated by advocates of EMRs-problems that are serious enough that clinician moral is at an all-time low. Many clinicians perceive that the disadvantages of current EMR systems override any benefits they had.

Implementing EMRs nationally had the potential to greatly improve medical care. To recover the lost opportunity, there should be a national strategy to develop a common EMR for all medical care, a project that would be on par with the development of the national highway system in the 1950’s and the space program of the 1960s. By having a single EMR, information would seamlessly transfer between clinicians and patients. It would enable researchers to definitively investigate clinical outcomes for various drugs and interventions and because this system would need to be built de novo, result in a more rational interface between clinician and the EMR than currently exist. Developing this system will require engineers to build the computer and data systems and to develop security systems to support a national program. The fundamental nature of medical record keeping will need to change. Substantial political will is needed to overcome resistance to change that will inevitably come from users of current EMRs who will be reluctant to adopt new systems so soon after the current EMRs were developed. Despite these challenges, this is a worthwhile endeavor since healthcare consumes 20% of the GDP yet there is no national infrastructure to support this large segment of US economy.

Short-Bio
Edward H. Livingston, M.D., F.A.C.S., A.G.A.F., has served as Deputy Editor for Clinical Content of JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association since July 1, 2012. Before that, he was a Contributing Editor at JAMA for 3 years.

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Dr. Livingston received his Medical Degree from UCLA. He completed a General Surgery Residency at UCLA and served as the Administrative Chief Resident for Surgery in 1992. After Residency, he remained on the faculty at UCLA eventually serving as Assistant Dean of the Medical School and Surgical Service Line Director for the VA Greater Los Angeles Health Care System. He also founded the UCLA bariatric surgery program.

In 2003, he moved to Dallas to become the Professor and Chairman of GI and Endocrine Surgery at the University Of Texas Southwestern School Of Medicine. During this time period, Dr. Livingston headed the VA’s national effort in bariatric surgery quality improvement. He was appointed as a Professor of Biomedical Engineering in 2007 at the University of Texas Arlington. Dr. Livingston became Chairman of the Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering at UTSW in 2010.

Dr. Livingston has had peer review funding and has published in excess of 150 peer reviewed papers as well as numerous other scientific writings. He has also served on numerous local and national committees and is a past president of the Association of VA Surgeons. He is an Adjunct Professor of Surgery at UTSW and also at Northwestern University.

Posted in Keynote, Speaker

Dan Gallahan, Ph.D.

Portrait of Daniel Gallahan, the Deputy Director of the Division of Cancer Biology at the National Cancer Institute.

Cancer Systems Biology: Towards a Better Understanding of the Disease
Dan Gallahan, Ph.D.
Deputy Director, Division of Cancer Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Speaking Time:  8:30am-9:05am, 17-Feb-17 (Friday)
Speaking Location:  Ballrom-D


Abstract
Cancer remains one of the most challenging and devastating diseases known to mankind.  Its negative impact on the quality of life and national economies constitute a world-wide health crisis, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).  While much progress has been made in our understanding of the disease along with corresponding breakthroughs in some specific treatments, further advances remain a major challenge to the scientific community. What we have learned is that cancer is a very diverse and multi-component disease involving not just one mutation or one cell but a finely orchestrated system of signaling networks and cellular niches interacting to enable the cancer to develop, metastasize, and survive. The speaker will outline the challenges of cancer research and recent activities within the scientific community and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to address these challenges using a multi-disciplinary, systems biology approach.

Short-Bio
Dan Gallahan is Deputy Director of the Division of Cancer Biology at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and helps lead the Division in its mission of supporting and facilitating basic cancer biology research.  His primary focus at NCI is the application of integrated approaches, tools, and data sets to understanding cancer. He established and still oversees the Division’s efforts in cancer systems biology, the latest of which is the Cancer Systems Biology Consortium (CSBC).  As Deputy Director, he also assists in planning and implementing the NCI’s overall efforts in genomics, proteomics, computational biology, and nanotechnology, and is a liaison with other government and commercial entities in the areas of technology and systems biology. Dr. Gallahan is a molecular and cancer biologist with broad expertise in the fields of systems biology, breast cancer, technology development, and science policy. He was trained in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland, with additional post-doctoral training at the NIH and the German Cancer Research Center.  His post-doctoral work included training in cancer biology, proteomics, and bioinformatics. Prior to joining the Division of Cancer Biology, he had an active NCI intramural career in the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology.

Posted in Keynote, Speaker

Matt Pipke, B.Sc., J.D.

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Health Care Sensor Informatics: Poised for an AI-like Breakout?
Matt Pipke, B.Sc., J.D.
Chief Technology Officer, PhysIQ Inc.
Speaking Time:  12:50pm-13:25pm, 16-Feb-17 (Thursday)
Speaking Location:  Ballrom-D




Abstract
In just the last 5 years, an explosive resurgence in “AI” has been driven by new-found efficacy of neural networks, an old technology previously regarded as largely ineffective for real-world problems. What happened? Far more data, especially images, text and voice from the scaling up of real-world production systems used by millions of users. By all appearances, medical sensor informatics are poised for a similar break-out, powered by wearable sensors and continuous physiological telemetry. It is an exciting time to be working in this area. What does the roadmap look like for commercial deployment of smart sensor informatics in health and medical applications? The speaker will present the perspective of the high-tech industry, examining the challenges, thrills and opportunities of realizing this roadmap from the fast-paced environment of companies bringing transformative change to health care.

Short-Bio
Matt Pipke is Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder at PhysIQ Inc., located in Chicago, where he oversees development and clinical testing of machine learning analytics for the company’s cloud-based health monitoring platform, for continuous ambulatory monitoring of human physiology using medical-grade wearable sensors. His focus is on personalized analytics to provide early warning of patient health derangement, novel surrogate markers for disease conditions, and detection and quantification of human behavior patterns based on sensor data.  Prior to co-founding PhysIQ, he was Chief Technology Officer at SmartSignal Corp. of Lisle, Illinois, which commercialized machine learning for anomaly detection in performance of complex physical systems and industrial equipment in the power and aviation industries. SmartSignal was acquired by GE in 2011.  Prior to SmartSignal, Matt worked as an IT consultant for several years, and before that worked as a patent attorney in private practice in Chicago. Matt received his bachelor’s degree in physics at the University of Chicago and his JD at Loyola University of Chicago.

Posted in Keynote, Speaker

Arthur Toga, PhD

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The Informatics of Neuroimaging
Arthur Toga, PhD
Director, Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, University of Southern California
Speaking Time:  8:30am-9:05am, 16-Feb-17 (Thursday)
Speaking Location:  Ballrom-D


Abstract
Mapping the human brain, and the brains of other species, has long been hampered by the fact that there is substantial variance in both the structure and function of this organ among individuals within a species.  Utilizing data from structural, functional, diffusion MRI, along with GWAS studies and clinical measures, we have built atlases with defined coordinate systems creating a framework for mapping and relating diverse data across studies.  This talk describes the development and application of a theoretical framework, computational tools and visualization techniques for the construction of probabilistic atlases of large numbers of individuals in a population. It begins with some historical examples of approaches to map the structure and function of brain and ends with promises to come.  Essential elements in performing this type of population based research are the informatics infrastructure to assemble, describe, disseminate and mine data collections along with computational resources necessary for large scale processing of big data such as whole genome sequence data and imaging data.  This talk also describes the methods we have employed to address these challenges.

Short-Bio
Arthur Toga, PhD, is Director, USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Director, USC Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, and USC Provost Professor of Ophthalmology, Neurology, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Radiology, and Engineering. He holds the Ghada Irani Chair in Neuroscience.  Dr. Toga is an internationally renowned neuroscientist who uses complex imaging data to improve our understanding of the brain in health and disease. A major focus of his research is developing 4D brain models that track and analyze complex patterns of dynamically changing brain structure in healthy development and disease states. He has developed multimodal imaging and data aggregation strategies and applied them in a variety of neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders.  His work in informatics includes the development and implementation of some of the largest and most widely used databases and data mining tools linking disparate data from genetics, imaging, clinical and behavior, supporting global efforts in Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease, among others.  He was trained in neuroscience and computer science and has written more than 1,000 papers, chapters and abstracts, including eight books.

Posted in Keynote, Speaker

Carla Smith, MA, FHIMSS, CNM

HIMSS 2020 Vision: The Future of Health IT
Carla Smith, MA, FHIMSS, CNM
Executive Vice President, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS)
Speaking Time:  8:30am-9:05am, 18-Feb-17 (Saturday)
Speaking Location:  Ballrom-D




Abstract
In today’s rapidly changing healthcare environment, leaders must understand how a multidisciplinary approach is required to not only thrive but even survive. Health IT remains a core foundational piece in reforming our healthcare system.  In particular, health IT tools are critical for improving patient safety and outcomes, increasing access, and greater success in value-based care delivery, quality reporting initiatives, as well as in opportunities to test new, innovative models of care. Carla Smith, HIMSS Executive Vice President, will share insight on the future of health IT and the role that HIMSS plays.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the health IT imperative
  • Identify trends impacting healthcare
  • Define efforts to optimize health engagements and care outcomes using information technology

Short-Bio
Carla Smith is Executive Vice President of HIMSS, a global, cause-based, not-for-profit organization focused on better health through information technology.  HIMSS leads efforts to optimize health engagements and care outcomes using IT.

Smith leads HIMSS’s North American business unit.  In this capacity, Smith leverages her extensive experience in nonprofit management to achieve HIMSS’s mission and maintain its financial health, primarily within the United States and Canada.

Smith has 30 years of experience in the information technology field, two-thirds of it focused on healthcare. She champions transformational innovations in the health sector, ensuring the right information is available to the right people at the right time to make the right health- and care-related decisions.

In addition to her responsibilities at HIMSS, Smith holds an appointment to CMS’s Outreach and Education Federal Advisory Committee, Chairs the Advisory Board of the Global Center for Health Innovation, serves on the Board of Directors for the National Stroke Association, serves as an advisor to the University of Michigan’s Health Informatics and Learning Health System programs, and is a publicly-elected official for the Village of Barton Hills, Michigan.

Before joining HIMSS in 2001, Ms. Smith served for seven years as the Chief Executive Officer of the Center for Healthcare Information Management (CHIM). Prior to entering the health sector, Ms. Smith focused on IT-related innovations within the manufacturing and banking sectors. She holds a Master’s degree, and has earned a Nonprofit Management Certification from Case Western Reserve University, and as well as her HIMSS Fellow status.

Posted in Keynote, Speaker